bagofdelights:

Classic childhood books from yesteryear

(via moderntoss)

Introversion

A friend shared this article: http://thoughtcatalog.com/laitin-amanda/2014/02/10-confessions-from-an-introvert/

Here are some extra thoughts, and how it applies to me personally:

Introvert awareness. I resonate with most of this. As much as I like to go out, it’s a drain. It’s an expensive thing, energywise to be out. I enjoy it, but it’s tough on occasion. I really click with that idea that interactions cost currency. Also, if those who know me don’t think I’m an introvert, I’m 41. I’ve learned to fake it. I can pass. I’m getting too old and cranky to try much to do that anymore though.

The best way to draw an introvert out of a shell, or to allow an introvert to come out, more accurately, is not to make a big deal of it. As soon, as I perceive that a person is judging me because I don’t want to talk about sports or some shit, I shut down, and write them off…more or less forever. Like it’s hard to redeem yourself. Like, that’s an expensive interaction with no ROI. Why bother. I got people in my life I treasure, and my alone time is better than forced awkward death march toward social obligation. I’m no rebel, but I’m pretty tired of society telling me what to do. I think I’m going to be ok with letting it down in some of those expectations of how long I have to endure an interaction I don’t want to do.

I do, however, love beezy, glib, banter-y conversation. Like talking and not saying shit. Wordplaying to be the point of it being like jazz imrov, or at least actual comedy imrov. Doing bits. I love it. It’s almost a character for me. You can do more when you have the power of anonymity. And if you affect a character, no one knows who you really are. It’s safe. If you’re in my inner circle, I really love banter.

What I hate is when a stranger tries to get deep. For instance, If you presume I have a normal family life, and ask me about it. I try to demure out of it, and you offer sympathy (not empathy) as you keep prying, especially if I’m out in a bar trying to not be bummed the fuck out. I’m contemplating if you’re worth the assault charge. I’m doing the statistics in my head. Or if a stranger makes presumptions about what I’m going to say. If you ask me a question, and based on a preconceived notion, I can hear you have already answered for me when you ask me the question, fuck you. I will go meta to the situation. point out that you are horrible. That I don’t need to defend myself to you. I owe you nothing. And remind you that your’e horrible.

Also, if every little thing is “weird” and you have to comment on it, and that’s all you say, I have written you off. You’re a waste of space and not worth talking to with any sincerity. “You put tabasco on your eggs? That’s weird!” I get it. You’re narrow minded. Very tiny things challenge your world view. I don’t need a color commentary. I’m not here to blow anyone’s minds. I’m just trying to make it through my day, like anyone else.

There’s really no middle ground with me. I have a tight, circle of friends who know more about me than they probably care to on occasion. (Been suggested any interesting facebook groups, guys?) And then a huge group, or on a stage…something where the interaction isn’t two-way. I like that. But a small networking thing, like they mention in the article. Horrible. The worst.

Any way, some extra, personal insight into an already pretty good article. I’m glad people are talking about this more. There is a stigma. I’ve been ashamed of it most of my life until the internet. Really. And I have a group of really fun, actually quite outgoing under many circumstances, group of friends who identify with this.

Do you think, right now a group of nomadic, borderline-literate shepherds are writing a book on how to live that will be shoddy, inconsistent, morally repugnant, and just plain dumb, yet in 2,000 years people will go: nailed it!

There are only three people who can look cool wearing fedoras.
Indiana Jones.
My friend Jason, who is no longer with us anymore
And this cat.

The rest of you, that’s some weak sauce.

There are only three people who can look cool wearing fedoras.
Indiana Jones.
My friend Jason, who is no longer with us anymore
And this cat.

The rest of you, that’s some weak sauce.

(via letssaynotonormal)

raltimore:

A Spike Jonze film 

raltimore:

A Spike Jonze film 

(via pygmygeek)

asker

Anonymous asked: Have I told you how awesome you are, today? I meant to ;)

Thanks. I wish you weren’t anonymous so I could pat you on the back too.

A Break-Down of a older Giantess Special Effects Video

Some of you have asked about the basic how-to of this one as well. 

I think I started with the background plate. I filmed my kitchen on a tripod, then myself walking out of it. My wall was pretty neutral, so I didn’t worry about keying too much. I was able to use the brightness of the wall, and the darkness of the wall to get there pretty well, but I still did have to do some tedious masking. Always with the masking. Oy!

I took pics straight on of the front and side of my fridge, then opened the door and took a pic of the interior. I re-constructed a 3D (ok, 2.5 D) fridge out of the flat pics in AffterEffects. I placed the fake fridge against the wall for her head to knock it over. I also animated the doors to swing open.

I similiary took a pic of my floor overhead and straight on, and replaced the existing floor with that plane. I cut the plane up, with a round hole for her head in the middle, and that round disk I cut into two pieces to slide off her head. I also added some thickness to it.

I digitally cut a hole in my ceiling, and used painted some cracks on.

When it came to shooting her, I put her in front of a green screen and tried to match the lighting.

I also put a little flour on her face and in her hair to make it look like she had sheet rock dust on her.

I filmed her standing up into camera frame. I comped her into the scene, and timed the floor to fly away, and the ceiling to crack. I also added some dust stock footage elements, and some sparks as if she broke through a wire. I also placed a shadow on her here and htere from the floor and ceiling.

Throw on some camera shake and a color grade to tie it together, and Bob’s your uncle!

A Break-Down of a older Giantess Special Effects Video

Some of you have asked about the basic how-to of this one as well.

I think I started with the background plate. I filmed my kitchen on a tripod, then myself walking out of it. My wall was pretty neutral, so I didn’t worry about keying too much. I was able to use the brightness of the wall, and the darkness of the wall to get there pretty well, but I still did have to do some tedious masking. Always with the masking. Oy!

I took pics straight on of the front and side of my fridge, then opened the door and took a pic of the interior. I re-constructed a 3D (ok, 2.5 D) fridge out of the flat pics in AffterEffects. I placed the fake fridge against the wall for her head to knock it over. I also animated the doors to swing open.

I similiary took a pic of my floor overhead and straight on, and replaced the existing floor with that plane. I cut the plane up, with a round hole for her head in the middle, and that round disk I cut into two pieces to slide off her head. I also added some thickness to it.

I digitally cut a hole in my ceiling, and used painted some cracks on.

When it came to shooting her, I put her in front of a green screen and tried to match the lighting.

I also put a little flour on her face and in her hair to make it look like she had sheet rock dust on her.

I filmed her standing up into camera frame. I comped her into the scene, and timed the floor to fly away, and the ceiling to crack. I also added some dust stock footage elements, and some sparks as if she broke through a wire. I also placed a shadow on her here and htere from the floor and ceiling.

Throw on some camera shake and a color grade to tie it together, and Bob’s your uncle!



I got a few requests on how I did the video of the giantess walking through the city. Here are the broad strokes:

1. I used Adobe After Effects’s roto brush. In fact it was the main reason this project came about. I wanted to try the new refine edges feature. It worked pretty ok. If you frame by frame it, you’ll notice the edge is hinky here and there. I admit, that’s on me. I could have take the time to refine it. But, I’m lazy and there was probably something good on TV, so there.

2. I figured out the scene’s camera data in CINEMA 4D. A good special effects artist will know the focus distance, zoom, camera angle, and all that before starting this project. A good one. There was something on TV then too.

3. I also plopped down buildings from Video Copilot’s Metropolitan. I could have modeled them, but see above, re: TV.

4. I put a sky-dome over the city that matched the same color as the model more or less. I also put a strong, big light that matched the sun. This was a quick process, so I’m happy to report: I didn’t miss any good TV.

5. I used several object buffers in C4D, so I could isolate and tweak focus separately.

6. I used the physical render engine in C4D. Then brought everything back in AE.

7. I sandwiched her between foreground and background layers. The texture of the ground she walked on was rough and pavement-y. So, I blended it with the actual 3D generated road to capture any shadows, and look more natural.

8. For the shadows on her, I moved a mask that consisted of a series of rectangles over and adjustment layer in 3D space as she walked. I also duplicated her footage, distorted it, fuzzed it out, and let it be an adjustment layer on the background buildings so she could cast a shadow on them.

9. I made fake birds happen. I should have used trapcode particular, but i didn’t. Better yet, I shouldn’t have bothered. They took 2 days to do, and look lame.

10. Slap some dirt charges at her foot steps.

11. Put a color look on it, including lens flares. If you don’t like lens flares, sit with your back to the sun and stare at Amish buggies. They help lazy FX artists tie a scene together like the Dude’s rug, and help him make important TV commitments. 

Final note: more than ever, pre-comping, pre-rendering, and proxies really sped things up for this project.

I got a few requests on how I did the video of the giantess walking through the city. Here are the broad strokes:

1. I used Adobe After Effects’s roto brush. In fact it was the main reason this project came about. I wanted to try the new refine edges feature. It worked pretty ok. If you frame by frame it, you’ll notice the edge is hinky here and there. I admit, that’s on me. I could have take the time to refine it. But, I’m lazy and there was probably something good on TV, so there.

2. I figured out the scene’s camera data in CINEMA 4D. A good special effects artist will know the focus distance, zoom, camera angle, and all that before starting this project. A good one. There was something on TV then too.

3. I also plopped down buildings from Video Copilot’s Metropolitan. I could have modeled them, but see above, re: TV.

4. I put a sky-dome over the city that matched the same color as the model more or less. I also put a strong, big light that matched the sun. This was a quick process, so I’m happy to report: I didn’t miss any good TV.

5. I used several object buffers in C4D, so I could isolate and tweak focus separately.

6. I used the physical render engine in C4D. Then brought everything back in AE.

7. I sandwiched her between foreground and background layers. The texture of the ground she walked on was rough and pavement-y. So, I blended it with the actual 3D generated road to capture any shadows, and look more natural.

8. For the shadows on her, I moved a mask that consisted of a series of rectangles over and adjustment layer in 3D space as she walked. I also duplicated her footage, distorted it, fuzzed it out, and let it be an adjustment layer on the background buildings so she could cast a shadow on them.

9. I made fake birds happen. I should have used trapcode particular, but i didn’t. Better yet, I shouldn’t have bothered. They took 2 days to do, and look lame.

10. Slap some dirt charges at her foot steps.

11. Put a color look on it, including lens flares. If you don’t like lens flares, sit with your back to the sun and stare at Amish buggies. They help lazy FX artists tie a scene together like the Dude’s rug, and help him make important TV commitments.

Final note: more than ever, pre-comping, pre-rendering, and proxies really sped things up for this project.