Do you think, right now a group of nomadic, borderline-literate shepherds are writing a book on how to live that will be shoddy, inconsistent, morally repugnant, and just plain dumb, yet in 2,000 years people will go: nailed it!

There are only three people who can look cool wearing fedoras.
Indiana Jones.
My friend Jason, who is no longer with us anymore
And this cat.

The rest of you, that’s some weak sauce.

There are only three people who can look cool wearing fedoras.
Indiana Jones.
My friend Jason, who is no longer with us anymore
And this cat.

The rest of you, that’s some weak sauce.

(via letssaynotonormal)

raltimore:

A Spike Jonze film 

raltimore:

A Spike Jonze film 

(via pygmygeek)

asker

Anonymous asked: Have I told you how awesome you are, today? I meant to ;)

Thanks. I wish you weren’t anonymous so I could pat you on the back too.

A Break-Down of a older Giantess Special Effects Video

Some of you have asked about the basic how-to of this one as well. 

I think I started with the background plate. I filmed my kitchen on a tripod, then myself walking out of it. My wall was pretty neutral, so I didn’t worry about keying too much. I was able to use the brightness of the wall, and the darkness of the wall to get there pretty well, but I still did have to do some tedious masking. Always with the masking. Oy!

I took pics straight on of the front and side of my fridge, then opened the door and took a pic of the interior. I re-constructed a 3D (ok, 2.5 D) fridge out of the flat pics in AffterEffects. I placed the fake fridge against the wall for her head to knock it over. I also animated the doors to swing open.

I similiary took a pic of my floor overhead and straight on, and replaced the existing floor with that plane. I cut the plane up, with a round hole for her head in the middle, and that round disk I cut into two pieces to slide off her head. I also added some thickness to it.

I digitally cut a hole in my ceiling, and used painted some cracks on.

When it came to shooting her, I put her in front of a green screen and tried to match the lighting.

I also put a little flour on her face and in her hair to make it look like she had sheet rock dust on her.

I filmed her standing up into camera frame. I comped her into the scene, and timed the floor to fly away, and the ceiling to crack. I also added some dust stock footage elements, and some sparks as if she broke through a wire. I also placed a shadow on her here and htere from the floor and ceiling.

Throw on some camera shake and a color grade to tie it together, and Bob’s your uncle!

A Break-Down of a older Giantess Special Effects Video

Some of you have asked about the basic how-to of this one as well.

I think I started with the background plate. I filmed my kitchen on a tripod, then myself walking out of it. My wall was pretty neutral, so I didn’t worry about keying too much. I was able to use the brightness of the wall, and the darkness of the wall to get there pretty well, but I still did have to do some tedious masking. Always with the masking. Oy!

I took pics straight on of the front and side of my fridge, then opened the door and took a pic of the interior. I re-constructed a 3D (ok, 2.5 D) fridge out of the flat pics in AffterEffects. I placed the fake fridge against the wall for her head to knock it over. I also animated the doors to swing open.

I similiary took a pic of my floor overhead and straight on, and replaced the existing floor with that plane. I cut the plane up, with a round hole for her head in the middle, and that round disk I cut into two pieces to slide off her head. I also added some thickness to it.

I digitally cut a hole in my ceiling, and used painted some cracks on.

When it came to shooting her, I put her in front of a green screen and tried to match the lighting.

I also put a little flour on her face and in her hair to make it look like she had sheet rock dust on her.

I filmed her standing up into camera frame. I comped her into the scene, and timed the floor to fly away, and the ceiling to crack. I also added some dust stock footage elements, and some sparks as if she broke through a wire. I also placed a shadow on her here and htere from the floor and ceiling.

Throw on some camera shake and a color grade to tie it together, and Bob’s your uncle!



I got a few requests on how I did the video of the giantess walking through the city. Here are the broad strokes:

1. I used Adobe After Effects’s roto brush. In fact it was the main reason this project came about. I wanted to try the new refine edges feature. It worked pretty ok. If you frame by frame it, you’ll notice the edge is hinky here and there. I admit, that’s on me. I could have take the time to refine it. But, I’m lazy and there was probably something good on TV, so there.

2. I figured out the scene’s camera data in CINEMA 4D. A good special effects artist will know the focus distance, zoom, camera angle, and all that before starting this project. A good one. There was something on TV then too.

3. I also plopped down buildings from Video Copilot’s Metropolitan. I could have modeled them, but see above, re: TV.

4. I put a sky-dome over the city that matched the same color as the model more or less. I also put a strong, big light that matched the sun. This was a quick process, so I’m happy to report: I didn’t miss any good TV.

5. I used several object buffers in C4D, so I could isolate and tweak focus separately.

6. I used the physical render engine in C4D. Then brought everything back in AE.

7. I sandwiched her between foreground and background layers. The texture of the ground she walked on was rough and pavement-y. So, I blended it with the actual 3D generated road to capture any shadows, and look more natural.

8. For the shadows on her, I moved a mask that consisted of a series of rectangles over and adjustment layer in 3D space as she walked. I also duplicated her footage, distorted it, fuzzed it out, and let it be an adjustment layer on the background buildings so she could cast a shadow on them.

9. I made fake birds happen. I should have used trapcode particular, but i didn’t. Better yet, I shouldn’t have bothered. They took 2 days to do, and look lame.

10. Slap some dirt charges at her foot steps.

11. Put a color look on it, including lens flares. If you don’t like lens flares, sit with your back to the sun and stare at Amish buggies. They help lazy FX artists tie a scene together like the Dude’s rug, and help him make important TV commitments. 

Final note: more than ever, pre-comping, pre-rendering, and proxies really sped things up for this project.

I got a few requests on how I did the video of the giantess walking through the city. Here are the broad strokes:

1. I used Adobe After Effects’s roto brush. In fact it was the main reason this project came about. I wanted to try the new refine edges feature. It worked pretty ok. If you frame by frame it, you’ll notice the edge is hinky here and there. I admit, that’s on me. I could have take the time to refine it. But, I’m lazy and there was probably something good on TV, so there.

2. I figured out the scene’s camera data in CINEMA 4D. A good special effects artist will know the focus distance, zoom, camera angle, and all that before starting this project. A good one. There was something on TV then too.

3. I also plopped down buildings from Video Copilot’s Metropolitan. I could have modeled them, but see above, re: TV.

4. I put a sky-dome over the city that matched the same color as the model more or less. I also put a strong, big light that matched the sun. This was a quick process, so I’m happy to report: I didn’t miss any good TV.

5. I used several object buffers in C4D, so I could isolate and tweak focus separately.

6. I used the physical render engine in C4D. Then brought everything back in AE.

7. I sandwiched her between foreground and background layers. The texture of the ground she walked on was rough and pavement-y. So, I blended it with the actual 3D generated road to capture any shadows, and look more natural.

8. For the shadows on her, I moved a mask that consisted of a series of rectangles over and adjustment layer in 3D space as she walked. I also duplicated her footage, distorted it, fuzzed it out, and let it be an adjustment layer on the background buildings so she could cast a shadow on them.

9. I made fake birds happen. I should have used trapcode particular, but i didn’t. Better yet, I shouldn’t have bothered. They took 2 days to do, and look lame.

10. Slap some dirt charges at her foot steps.

11. Put a color look on it, including lens flares. If you don’t like lens flares, sit with your back to the sun and stare at Amish buggies. They help lazy FX artists tie a scene together like the Dude’s rug, and help him make important TV commitments.

Final note: more than ever, pre-comping, pre-rendering, and proxies really sped things up for this project.

Streets ahead, one step behind

A friend and I were just talking about “Community” (because it’s a day that ends in Y). He let loose the expression, “Streets ahead” and I talked about remembering the twitter meltdown. He went googling it and came up with my name…or a slight misspelling of it in this article. Good times!

Him: Harmon is always streets ahead on his slang.

Me: I was so unrealistically invested in that. I saw the original twitter meltdown, and when it made its way into a script, I had such an undeserved ownership of the moment.

[He goes googling, comes up with this article, doesn’t realize it was me.]

Him: “went back to find something that had the old theme song tweets in them because I like them. Found this:

“Fan Tim Stoltz suggested that Harmon bring “streets ahead” into the world of Community, but it seems Harmon was one step ahead of him.

@tim_stoltz : @danharmon Your hatred of “Glee” has made its way into “Community;” how long till your new favorite phrase makes it?
@danharmon : @tim_stotz I’m putting it in the current script, so it’ll be a few weeks. But I have to get the world understanding it by then!”

One letter away from having actual ownership.”

Me: I forgot about that! Follow question: is that real? I don’t remember doing it…though it seems pretty like me to say. [I didn’t quite get what he meant, and didn’t understand he didn’t realize it was I who had originally said it, and didn’t even see the misspelling of my last name at first.]

Him: Oh, fuck, that IS you. haha. They just got the name wrong. It links to your twitter. ha

Here’s the link to the article that almost gets my name right (it is right in the reply tweet).

evilgalprods:

Popped Culture - Series by Dan LuVisi